Publishing Stories of Resiliency and Resistance: Examples of Langaa in Cameroon April 13, 2017 1 Comment

The regular monthly meeting of the Greater Kansas City Black History Study Group is scheduled for St. Mary’s Episcopal Church in Kansas City, Monday, April 17, 2017 at 6:00 pm. The scheduled guest speaker is Dr. Kathryn Toure, who will discuss her work with Langaa Research and Publishing of Cameroon, Africa.

Immigrants We Get the Job Done February 2, 2017 No Comments

At a recent Women’s March in Kansas City, at Washington Square Park, I saw a woman holding a sign saying “Immigrants We Get the Job Done.” I have found this to be true, especially ever since I graduated from the University of Kansas in political science and started my professional life working in refugee resettlement [...]

Nous sommes des indigènes de cette planète; nous venons tous de la même Terre… January 30, 2017 No Comments

Ce début de l’année 2017, je pense à notre planète et à veiller sur elle pour que nos petits-enfants et leurs petits-enfants puissent y vivent et jouir de ses beautés et de siècles de créativité et d’ingéniosité humaines.

We Are All Indigenous to this Planet, We All Come from the Same Earth December 24, 2016 No Comments

As 2017 approaches, I am thinking of Earth and caring for Earth, so our grandchildren and their grandchildren may walk this planet and enjoy its beauties and generations of human creativity and ingenuity. I am thinking of Water Protectors and of Earth Guardians and shifts in human consciousness. So in that spirit, I’d like to share these recent videos of our young and prophetic brother Xiuhtezcatl Martinez.

Garrison School Cultural Center holds fall open house November 7, 2016 No Comments

Dr. Cecelia Robinson will be busy for the next few days as she dons her historian hat and works at finalizing gallery spaces in the Garrison School Cultural Center. Robinson is the historian for the Clay County African American Legacy Inc., but her love of history — and Clay County’s in particular — is a passion to which she has devoted more than 30 years of her time and energy.
Her efforts and those of some William Jewell College students and a few others will be on display Wednesday, Nov. 9, at a fall open house tour that begins at 6 p.m.

Nedra Bonds: The angry quilter September 25, 2016 No Comments

I recently visited the Quindaro neighborhood, along the Missouri River, in Kansas City, Kansas, USA with a friend. We paid silent homage to the folk who saved part of the historic village from being turned into a landfill. Read more, much more, in this BBC story, Nedra Bonds: The angry quilter. Nedra Bonds explains what motivated her to turn the family tradition of quilting into a platform for political protest.

Time to teach and learn peace? June 16, 2016 No Comments

When I tell people I teach peace, the usual response is, “What?” Usually they think they’ve misheard me, perhaps thinking I said “peas,” or sometimes “P.E.,” like physical education. “No, peace,” I explain, giving a visual cue using my peace sign fingers, “—things like conflict resolution, compassionate communication, nonviolence, sustainability. You know, the knowledge and skills we need to create a peaceful world.” Read more from Stephanie Knox Cubbon…

L’élaboration de stratégies efficaces April 25, 2016 No Comments

Les prix A. Philip Randolph ont été distribués le 15 avril 2016, au Centre du patrimoine culturel Bruce R. Watkins à Kansas City, USA. Lors de la cérémonie de remise des prix, Patricia Jones, présidente de la section de Kansas City de l’Institut A. Philip Randolph, a partagé des histoires de ce pionnier de l’organisation des travailleurs. Dans les années 1920 et 1930, Randolph a aidé à organiser les porteurs et les femmes de ménage travaillant sur les wagons Pullman de chemins de fer de l’Amérique et a créé le premier syndicat dirigé par les afro-américains. Plusieurs des prix cette année ont été faites aux églises dans la région de Kansas City qui ont fourni des espaces de réunion pour les travailleurs et organisateurs du mouvement ouvrier.

Crafting Effective Strategies No Comments

The A. Philip Randolph awards were distributed on April 15, 2016, at the Bruce R. Watkins Cultural Heritage Center and Museum in Kansas City. In the 1920s and 1930s, Randolph helped organize America’s porters and maids working on the Pullman railroad cars and created the first African-American-led labor union. Many Pullman maids and wives, daughters, and sisters of Pullman porters were members of the Ladies Auxiliary which shaped “public debates over black manhood and unionization, setting political agendas for the black community, and crafting effective strategies to win racial and economic justice.”

Lecture Me. Really. October 27, 2015 No Comments

A recent New York Times article “Lecture Me. Really.” makes the case for good and great lectures by excellent lecturers combined with active and analytical listening and synthesizing note taking by students, as well as small weekly discussion sections, as a way to teach and learn the humanities at colleges and universities [in the USA] in this day and age. But lectures alone seem to be insufficient.